Cape Town port plans R750m expansion and development.

Posted On Friday, 08 November 2002 10:01 Published by
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CAPE TOWN The port of Cape Town is planning to spend R750m on developing world-class ship repair facilities and to expand the container terminal. A 14ha industrial park and a new cruise liner terminal are also in the pipeline.

CAPE TOWN The port of Cape Town is planning to spend R750m on developing world-class ship repair facilities and to expand the container terminal. A 14ha industrial park and a new cruise liner terminal are also in the pipeline.

However, the conflicts of interest between enlarged ship repair facilities and their proximity to retail outlets and fivestar hotels are a major problem for the port authorities.

Billy Cilliers, planning and development manager of the National Ports Authority of SA, outlined the planned expansion yesterday to delegates attending the Port Management Association of Eastern and Southern Africa conference.

He said the port planned to expand its container terminal by 300m towards the sea and consolidate container operations behind the berths.

Preliminary cost estimates for this project were about R400m and an environmental impact assessment was now under way.

The second project planned for the next five to seven years was world-class ship repair facilities at Elliot basin. The port was considering offering a concession to private operators for 20-25 years to equip and manage ship repair facilities. A preliminary estimate for the cost of developing these facilities was about R350m.

Another project the port was considering in the next few years was to develop 14ha of land that previously housed a power station into a 'port industrial park' to accommodate port-related industries in a secure environment.

In the medium term, the port aimed to integrate the industrial park with the port, which would involve rerouting the N7 Milnerton Road into a new intersection with the N2. The port is negotiating with local authorities on the issue.

The port is also planning to improve access for the fruit industry. Increasing congestion around the V&A Waterfront from the building of the new convention centre, fivestar hotels and other developments were likely to make it more difficult for fruit trucks to reach the port.

An important development envisaged in seven to 15 years' time was to build a new cruise liner terminal, Cilliers said. Cape Town was promoting itself as a tourist destination and cruise liners were an important part of the package.

Most cruise liners were accommodated at the V&A Waterfront, with the larger vessels having to dock at the fruit berths. The arrival of cruise liners tended to coincide with the Cape's peak fruit export period, which created a dilemma for the port of whether to accommodate the liners or the fruit exporters.


Publisher: Business Day
Source: Business Day

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